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Highland Restoration DKI
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Orangeville, ON
L9W 3X5

News

Thank you @OIAAOfficial for hosting the annual holiday party at the beautiful @FairmontRYH The @highlandDKI team i… https://t.co/guS9L96vu1
Highland with other local @Habitat_org sponsors at last nights appreciation event. #givingback #proudsponsor… https://t.co/HD7cQmU5sn
From Environment Canada, Snow squall watch issued for Dufferin County. Stay safe in your travels. #CanadianWinter https://t.co/ceqMbeOiDB

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4 days ago
Timeline Photos

Thank you OIAA for hosting the annual holiday party at the beautiful Fairmont Royal York The Highland DKI team is here #oiaa #holidayparty

4 days ago
Timeline Photos

Highland with other local @habitat sponsors at last nights appreciation event. #givingback #proudsponsor #habitatforhumanity

5 days ago
Timeline Photos

From Environment Canada, Snow squall watch issued for Dufferin County. Stay safe in your travels. #CanadianWinter

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Update

Live burn shows just how quickly Christmas tree fires can turn devastating and deadly.

The devastating damage Christmas tree fires can inflict on people and property – and just how quickly it can happen – were vividly demonstrated during a live burn event on Monday at the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission’s (CPSC) research lab in Rockville, MD. The footage (above) underscores just how fast a dried out Christmas tree burns, with flashover occurring in about 30 seconds, while a well-watered tree burns at a far slower rate.
National news outlets covered the event, including The Today Show, CNN, FOX News, NBC, Univision and ABC News. Watch the ABC News featuring NFPA President Jim Pauley, who addressed the potential risks posed by Christmas tree and candle fires, while reminding everyone about the life-saving value of working smoke alarms in the home and a having a home fire escape plan.
Of course, the goal of the burn event isn’t to scare people away from enjoying the holidays. It’s to remind everyone about the importance of taking simple safety precautions that can ensure a festive and fire-safe season.

For a wealth of information, videos, tip sheets and other resources addressing the safe use of Christmas trees, candles and other holiday decorations, visit www.nfpa.org/external-link.

@highlandDKI#Christmassafety

Highland Restoration help out in Nova Scota

Yesterday, 7 of our teams headed off to help out Meco DKI in Glace Bay, Nova Scotia with the severe flooding they experienced on Thanksgiving.

From the CBC yesterday:

Some people in Cape Breton are still desperate for information on where to turn for help after the flooding on Thanksgiving Monday.

Here are some answers from a phone-in on Monday, hosted by CBC Cape Breton’s Information Morning, which included a lawyer, an insurance specialist, a general contractor, a disaster restoration specialist and officials from Nova Scotia Department of Transportation and Infrastructure and the Cape Breton Regional Municipality:

Water bills and municipal taxes

Tricia O’Neil’s home on St. Peters Road in Sydney has been declared uninhabitable, so she and her family are staying with friends.

“What are the next steps?” she asked the panel of experts. “Do we still have to pay municipal taxes? Do we still need to pay water?”

Whitney Ave flood damage

People affected by the Thanksgiving Monday flood are still looking for answers on what to do next. (Norma Jean MacPhee/CBC)

Christina Lamey, a spokesperson with the mayor’s office, said water accounts can be suspended or cancelled.

Liam Gillis, a lawyer with Sampson McPhee, said homeowners can notify the Cape Breton Regional Municipality’s taxation department if their homes have been deemed uninhabitable.

“Sometimes they can have a reduction in their taxes for that uninhabitable space,” he said.

What does insurance cover?

The limits of insurance coverage are an ongoing frustration for some who didn’t understand why they weren’t covered for flooding.

While coverage for sewer backup is “pretty common,” the experts said most people are likely not covered for overland water damage.

“In the past year and a half, some insurance companies have developed extended water coverage,” said Amanda Dean, the vice president for the Insurance Bureau of Canada’s Atlantic region. “It is new on the market.”

So, determining the cause of the flooding is key.

“If you disagree with an insurance adjuster’s assessment of the cause of damage, it’s important to have someone else in — perhaps a restoration expert that can provide a second opinion.” Gillis said.

What can you do while you wait for an adjuster?

Walter Dewey, whose home was damaged by an overflowing brook, said he has insurance but is still waiting for an adjuster to visit.

Dean suggested he keep a record of the damage.

“Document the damage. Take photos,” she said. “Then, clean up what you can. Anything you can do to mitigate further damage.”

Sydney Flood

Many homes sustained catastrophic damage, while thousands of others lost the contents of their basements in the flooding. (CBC)

Homeowners should try to access insurance money first. If the damage is not covered, the homeowner will need to provide evidence that the insurance company was not willing to cover damages before making a claim to the disaster fund.

What’s covered in the federal disaster fund?

Dean said you can’t get help through the federal government’s Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangements program for something that would have been covered by insurance, had you bought it.

“If you could have purchased, let’s say, $10,000 worth of sewer backup coverage, that $10,000 is deducted from what you are able to get from DFAA,” she said.

What other financial assistance is available?

The United Way, its agencies and the Cape Breton Regional Municipality are meeting to discuss how short-term relief money will be distributed.

The province has contributed $500,000 and the United Way has raised more than $60,000.

“We now know who needs what,” Lamey said. “That’s a big thing today, to get the plan in place to move that money.”

Lamey said it’s vital for everyone with damage to call the municipal helpline at 902-562-4357 to be registered so officials can assess the total picture.

Mayor Cecil Clarke said the helpline has received 650 calls since it was created.

With files from CBC Cape Breton